All posts by Constance Anderson

Sending Surveys Via Text Message (SMS)

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Sending Surveys Via Text Message (SMS)

There are two ways to think about SMS surveys.  One way to deploy them is to “push” the survey or survey link out to members.  The other is to “pull” respondents from a promotion.  Here we’ll discuss the pros, cons, and considerations for each method.

Push Surveys

The question we get asked most often at MemberXP® is whether a credit union can “push” the link to a survey out to members via a text message or even embed a survey into the texting app.  Because MemberXP® is omnichannel, we can help your credit union push survey links to members or embed survey questions into the text app.

Getting Ready to Deploy Push SMS Surveys

In order to push surveys out to members via their mobile phone numbers, it’s important to examine the legal and practical ramifications.  Your credit union will need to have two processes in place to push surveys:

  1. The ability to identify which member phone numbers are mobile numbers.
  2. Permission from members to text a survey to them.

Getting members’ permission to text messages to them.  Although there is no definitive case law about texting surveys, we recommend credit unions proceed with caution by getting members’ permission to send them surveys via SMS.  Even if you have members’ permission to send account alerts, you should get specific permission for surveys and, of course, marketing messages.  A highly-publicized lawsuit against Papa John’s established that just because consumers sign up for text alerts–in this case pizza delivery alerts—it doesn’t give the company the right to push other types of messages to them.

Of course even if you have members’ permissions to text surveys to them, you’ll want to give them a way to opt-out.  MemberXP® will include this with every push SMS survey as shown here.

A good way to begin with push SMS surveys is to gather mobile numbers and text survey permissions for all new members and text your MemberView new member survey.  Here’s a sample new member message:

In-App or Web Link

Another consideration is whether to put your survey questions within a series of text messages or to simply text a link to your online survey.  Here are some pros and cons of each:

Pros Cons
In-App
  • A member does not need a smartphone to take the survey.
  • Response rate is likely to be higher.
  • The survey will need to be very short—3 questions or less.
  • You’ll get very little, if any, comments.
Web Link
  • The survey can be longer; you can use the same survey you send by email.
  • You’ll get more actionable data and comments.
  • A member needs a smartphone to take the survey.
  • Response rate is likely to be lower.

Pull Surveys

Another way to get started with SMS surveys is to build your mobile phone and survey list through a “pull” method, i.e., invite members to take your survey via a short code and a keyword.  For example, you can invite members to text a short code such as 123456 and enter the word “Survey.”  The member then gets a link to your online survey or a series of 1 to 3 short questions.

The advantage of this type of SMS survey is that it’s easier to launch.  There’s no need to get members’ mobile phone numbers, and if you present it in a straightforward way, there’s no confusion as to whether the member has opted-in to take a survey.  Moreover, you’ll be building a mobile number list for future surveys.

The disadvantage of this type of survey is that you are likely to get a low response rate unless you publicize it in your branches, on transaction receipts, and in your other communications with members.  In addition, you’ll probably need to offer a prize or drawing to get members to participate.

Another disadvantage is that this type of survey is more of an automated comment card than an email, phone, or snail mail survey.  You’re most likely to get responses from those who had a problem (Not that that’s a bad thing!).  That’s why we recommend offering an incentive to broaden the pool of those taking the survey.  You’ll also miss out on the opportunity to embed variables such as member age, etc., into the survey like you’d have with an email or push SMS survey.

We’re Here to Help

Need help crafting your SMS survey strategy?  Let us know.  We’re happy to discuss the possibilities with your team.

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MemberView Testimonial Permissions

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MemberView Testimonial Permissions

According to Nielsen, 70% of consumers trust online recommendations from other consumers.  That’s why so many credit unions are using member testimonials on their websites, social media, and printed marketing collateral. In the past, getting member testimonials was a time-consuming task for marketers.  MemberView changes all that.

With MemberView’s automated testimonial permission function, you can easily gather, track, and deploy testimonials from your raving fans.

Here’s how it works.

When a member gives you a positive score on their overall experience or other parameter of your choosing, the member gets an opportunity to provide permission for your credit union to use their comments as a testimonia.  Here’s an example:

Testimonial Question Screenshot

 

We’ll notify you via an email alert anytime a member gives permission to use a testimonial.

In addition, you can track all posts via the Testimonial Permissions Report in the MemberView reporting platform.

Let us know if you’d like help crafting your custom MemberView testimonial permissions option. There’s no charge for the consultation, and we’re happy to help!

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Testimonial Permissions Report

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Testimonial Permissions Tracking in MemberView

If you have chosen to include a testimonial solicitation option at the end of your MemberView surveys, you can track activity via MemberView’s testimonial permissions report. You can learn how to access the report here.

A Tour of the Testimonial Permissions Report

The Testimonial Permissions Tab on the MemberView Saves, Opportunities, Social Media report provides a robust tracking system for member testimonials.

Testimonial Report Screenshot

  1. Select the Testimonial Tab to view a list of testimonial permissions.
  2. The gauges at the top of the report show you the number of testimonials you have available for use as well as the number you’re using and have retired.
  3. You can filter the report by share status.
  4. Survey Number. Click on this link to view the entire survey.
  5. Date of Survey. This is the date the member completed the survey, not the date the member interaction took place.  To find out the date of the interaction, click on the survey number in the first column and look at the survey header.
  6. Member Name.
  7. Member Email.
  8. This shows the type of member experience survey that the member received.
  9. Promoter Designation. This column shows Promoters (those who give a score of 9 or 10 out of 10), Passives (those who give a score of 7 or 8 out of 10), or Detractors (Those who give a score of 0 through 6 out of 10).  Many credit unions only give the testimonial option on their surveys to Promoters.
  10. Permission to Use Name. Some credit unions give members the option to share a testimonial with or without their name.  This column indicates whether the member has given permission to use his/her name.
  11. This shows whether a testimonial is “Unused,” “Shared,” or “Retired.”  You can change the status of a testimonial by clicking “Change Status” in this column.
  12. Date Shared. When you move a testimonial from “Unused” to “Shared” in the Status column, this column populates with the share date.
  13. A pencil icon appears in this column is a user has left a note about the testimonial such as a follow-up or comment on the testimonial.  To view the complete survey and the notes or to add a note, click on the survey number in the first column.
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Social Media Report

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Social Media Push Tracking in MemberView

If you have chosen to include a social media push option at the end of your MemberView surveys, you can track activity via MemberView’s social media report. You can learn how to access the Social Media report here.

A Tour of the Social Media Report

The Social Tab on the MemberView Saves, Opportunities, Social report provides a robust tracking system for social media shares.

Social Media Report

  1. Select the Social Media Tab to view a list of social shares.
  2. The gauges at the top of the screen show you the number of shares for the time period you’ve selected and the median Promoter score of all sharers.
  3. A chart shows you the number of shares by social platform.
  4. You can filter the report by
    1. Social Platform
    2. Promoter StatusPromoter, Passive or Detractor
    3. Coaches (Users with Executive level access will see all coaches. Users with Coach level access will only see members assigned to them.)
  5. Survey Number. Click on this link to view the entire survey.
  6. Date of Survey. This is the date the member completed the survey, not the date the member interaction took place.  To find out the date of the interaction, click on the survey number in the first column and look at the survey header.
  7. Member Name.
  8. Member Email.
  9. This shows the type of member experience survey that the member received.
  10. Coach and Branch or Department. This column indicates where the member interaction occurred. Coaches will see all interactions that occurred in their branch or department.
  11. Promoter Designation. This column shows Promoters (those who give a score of 9 or 10 out of 10), Passives (those who give a score of 7 or 8 out of 10), or Detractors (Those who give a score of 0 through 6 out of 10).  Many credit unions only give the social sharing option on their surveys to Promoters.
  12. Social Platform. This column shows the social platform the member used for sharing.
  13. A pencil icon appears in this column is a user has left a note about the share such as a follow-up or comment on the share.  To view the complete survey and the notes or to add a note, click on the survey number in the first column.
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MemberView Saves Report Criteria

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MemberView Saves Report Criteria

The Criteria

The following parameters determine whether a survey appears on the Saves report in MemberView:

  1.  A Promoter score below a “9.”
  2. A Member Effort score below a “6.”
  3. A Satisfaction score below a “4.”
  4. A member requests a follow-up.

Why Those Threshholds?

Our users often ask why we use those specific criteria.  We’ve chosen them based on these 4 factors:

  • There was a consensus of our users based on how they wanted to receive their alerts.  Most of our users are looking for top-two-box scores on experiences which is a good indicator that the member has had a good or great experience.
  • Our research with the Filene Research Institute into Member Effort shows that anytime a member gives a score of 1 through 5 on member effort, they’ve probably experienced some difficulty in the process.  Those who leave a score of 5 or below on that question tend to give negative rather than positive open-ended feedback when they do leave comments.
  • We also know from secondary research that if a member gives a “3” out of 5 on a survey they’ve had an undifferentiated experience at best and are at risk for attrition.  Again, members who leave a comment with a score of 3 tend to leave a more negative rather than a more positive comment.
  • We wanted to create consistency for the Member Effort Score and the Satisfaction Score with the Net Promoter framework which dictates that anyone not giving the highest two scores appear on within the closed loop process.
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MemberView Key Performance Indicators

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MemberView Key Performance Indicators

Play Video IconWatch the Video:  MemberView Key Performance Indicators

Learn about the best uses of member satisfaction scores, promoter scores, member effort scores, and individual performer scores.  Length: 20 minutes

Your MemberView Voice of Member reports include important key member experience performance indicators.  It’s important for all stakeholders involved in the member experience–from the Board of Directors to credit union team members–to understand the signficance and use of each of the measures discussed here.

A credit union should expect its key performance indicator scores will be higher for specific experiences since the survey respondents are those who are actively using the credit union.  A member relationship survey, on the other hand, may include responses from members who use the credit union infrequently.  Some other factors that can affect scores include whether indirect borrowers are included and whether those who have been denied loans are included.

Overall Experience (Member Satisfaction)

What it means…

The overall experience score reflects any satisfaction questions you are asking members.  A common satisfaction question might look like this:

How would you rate your overall experience in obtaining your loan?

These types of questions measure the basics. They reflect core competence in retail financial service delivery.  Most respondents will give a score of 4 or 5 (on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being best) unless something went wrong during their experience.

How to use it…

While the overall experience score is shown in the MemberView dashboard and scorecard, it’s not strongly correlated with member loyalty so it has little predictive value.  On the other hand, it can be an indicator of member experiences that are broken.  If the overall experience score for a particular experience is below a 4.0, there is probably an issue with that member journey.

Unless a credit union is experiencing a great deal of attrition and member dissatisfaction, we don’t recommend using this score for measuring the credit union’s overall member experience at a high level.  The bar is simply too low for this measure to make it helpful for any credit union that is serious about beating the competition by creating an extraordinary member experience.

Promoter Score

What it means…

Every MemberView survey includes a Promoter score based on the Net Promoter Score® developed in 2003 by Fred Reichfield of Bain & Company. Reichfeld’s article, “The One Number You Need to Grow,” published in the Harvard Business Review, described how the score was positively correlated to customer loyalty.

The score is based on the simple question: “How likely is it that you would recommend our company/product/service to a friend or colleague?”

The scoring for the question is based on a 0 to 10 scale.

Promoters are those who respond with a score of 9 or 10 and are considered loyal enthusiasts. Detractors are those who respond with a score of 0 to 6 – unhappy customers. Scores of 7 and 8 are passives, and they will only count towards the total number of respondents, but not directly affect the formula. NPS® is calculated by subtracting the percentage of customers who are Detractors from the percentage of customers who are Promoters.

The Promoter score can be as low as −100 (everybody is a detractor) or as high as +100 (everybody is a promoter). A Promoter score that is positive (i.e., higher than zero) is felt to be good.

MemberView also includes an open-ended follow-up question to help credit unions discover why members are promoters, passives, or detractors.  This open-ended question is critical to helping the credit union understand the reasons behind the score itself and helps make the score actionable.

How to use it…

The Promoter score is primarily a measure of brand loyalty. Members who recommend the credit union to others are taking the risk that the credit union will perform as well for their friends and colleagues as they do for themselves.  The score reflects the member’s emotional attachment to the brand often based on an experience that goes beyond core competence in retail financial service delivery. The Promoter score is much more highly correlated to member loyalty and repurchase than the overall satisfaction score.

However, the Net Promoter Score® is not without its drawbacks. Some critics have pointed out that some very large companies have relatively low Net Promoter Scores® while some “Mom and Pop” stores have very high Net Promoter Scores®.  In our experience, members give their credit unions a fairly high Net Promoter Score®, especially compared to banks because they feel a sense of ownership and a sense of being respected and valued.  However, those good feelings don’t always translate into expanded account relationships if the credit union doesn’t offer competitive pricing or convenience. That is why we recommend using the score as part of a balanced scorecard rather than a stand alone measure.  Since credit unions are member-owned,  the Promoter score is a good reflection of how well the credit union is serving its members by creating a unique and desirable member brand experience.

We don’t think the Promoter score is the best measure of team and individual performance since it tends to be more reflective of the member’s feeling about the brand overall than about an individual performer or isolated transaction.

For a member relationship survey, credit unions should set a goal of +60.00 or better.  High performing credit unions achieve a Promoter score of +65.00 to +70.00.  For specific experience surveys, the goal should be +80.00.  High performing credit unions generally achieve scores of +80.00 or better across delivery channels for specific experiences such as account opening, basic transacting, and lending.  These scores reflect suppression of indirect borrowers from member relationship survey invitations and suppression of denied loans from a lending survey invitation.

Member Effort Score

What it means…

Every MemberView survey includes a Member Effort score based on groundbreaking research from the Customer Contact Council. Their July 2010 article in the Harvard Business Review, “Stop Trying to Delight Your Customers,” showed that ease of doing business trumps customer service as a predictor of customer loyalty.

The researchers asked this single question: “How much effort did you personally have to put forth to handle your request?” of 75,000 B2C and B2B customers over a 3-year period. They found a high correlation between low customer effort and loyalty. Of those who expended low effort, 94% expressed an intention to repurchase, 88% said they would increase spending with the company, and only 1% said they would speak negatively about the company. Conversely, 81% of customers who put forth high effort indicated they would spread negative word-of-mouth about the company.

The MemberView Member Effort score is derived from a single question:

“How easy did we make it for you to (complete your transaction, obtain your loan, open your account, etc.?)”

The scoring for the question is based on a 1 to 7 scale based on cross-industry standards.  Members who give a score of 5 or less on the question are presented with a follow-up question asking what the credit union could have done to make the process easier.

How to use it…

The Member Effort score has two uses.  The first is to determine if specific member journeys are easy or difficult. In general, a score below 6.0 indicates that there is room for improvement for a particular member experience.  Relatively seamless experiences score a 6.5 or better.

The second use of the Member Effort score is in its predictive value for increased member walletshare.  The score represents how well the credit union is positioned to compete in an era of e-commerce and m-commerce. That is why we advise credit unions to include it in a balanced scorecard of member experience metrics.

The Member Effort score is less effective as a measure of team and individual performance. While individual performers can reduce member effort, they typically cannot do it while working within cumbersome processes.

Member Effort Gap

What it means…

MemberView goes beyond simple member effort scoring, by tracking member expectations for ease of use alongside member actual evaluations of a credit union’s ease of use.  The member effort gap is the difference between a member’s expectation for ease of an experience and perception of the actual ease of an experience.

How to use it…

A credit union can assess how the extent to which it exceeds member expectations by looking for a Member Effort gap score in the positive range.  A score of +1.0 or better means a credit union is signficantly exceeding member expectations for ease of use.

Individual Performer Score

What it means…

The Individual Performer Score in MemberView is the average of all questions that gauge individual team member behaviors.  It does not include the Promoter question, the Member Effort question, the Overall Satisfaction question or any question that asks about a process.  It is a true reflection of an individual’s performance based on factors that he or she can control.  It ranges from 1.0 to 5.0 with 5.0 being the best.

How to use it…

We recommend using this score for evaluating and rewarding teams and individuals.  It is the most accurate reflection of an individual’s performance.  Because each credit union can customize the questions that gauge individual performance, there is not standard benchmark.  Credit unions that ask sales questions generally have lower individual performer scores than those who do not.  We’re happy to consult with you to set goals based on your own questions and benchmarked data.

Total Experience Score

What it means…

The total experience score is simply an average of the scores for all questions (except the Promoter and Member Effort questions).  The score ranges from is 1.0 to 5.0 with 5.0 being the best.

How to use it…

Because each credit union can customize survey questions, there is not standard benchmark.  Credit unions that ask sales questions generally have lower total experience scores than those that do not.  We’re happy to consult with you to set goals based on your own questions and benchmarked data.

*Net Promoter, Net Promoter Score, and NPS are trademarks of Satmetrix, Bain & Company, and Fred Reichfield.
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Hughes FCU Leads Nation in Market Growth

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Hughes Logo Market Growth Leader

Congratulations to Hughes Federal Credit Union in Tucson, AZ for its recognition as one of the nation’s top five credit unions in market growth according to S & P Global Market Intelligence. The credit union has deployed both MemberShoppers and MemberView omnichannel voice of member and is consistently among the top-ranked MemberXP users.

Focusing on creating a brand-defining member experience translates into strong member relationships and robust growth for the credit union. Some naysayers contend that focusing on the customer experience is expensive and yields little ROI, but for Hughes and other top-performing credit unions the correlation between member experience metrics and growth metrics is clear.

MemberXP is honored to partner with Hughes FCU to provide the member journey data points, coaching tools, and analytics that the credit union uses to help craft an exceptional member experience.

Using the MemberView Opportunities Report to Build Member Walletshare

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Using the MemberView Opportunities Report to Build Member Walletshare

Research reveals that the average member household has 5 to 7 accounts at various financial institutions.  Yet, on average, that household maintains 2 accounts at their credit union.  The real key to member loyalty is becoming each member’s primary financial institution by capturing at least 4 member accounts per household.  Once you’ve reached that level, members are much less likely to defect.

However, the problem for credit unions has been that we often don’t know which products or services the member–especially a new member–is really looking for.  That’s where one of the most powerful features of MemberView comes in.

The instant email alert and response tracking system built into the MXProdigy reporting portal lets your team know instantly that a member is interested in a product or service. You can then use the Opportunities report to track your sales efforts.  Learn how to access the Opportunities report here.

A Tour of the Opportunities Report

The Opportunities Tab on the MemberView Saves and Opportunities provides a robust data set for managing upsell contacts with members.

Opportunities Report

  1. Select the Opportunities Tab to view a list of members who have requested more information about a credit union produce or service.
  2. The gauges at the top of the screen show you the status of each response. You’ll also see the average number of business days it takes your team to respond.  You can set a custom goal for the average number of days you’d like to take to respond.
  3. You can filter the report by
    • Status—New Lead, Fulfilled, or Won
    • Aging
    • Coaches (Users with Executive level access will see all coaches. Users with Coach level access will only see members assigned to them.)
  4. Survey Number. Click on this link to view the entire survey.
  5. Flag Column.  A flag in this column indicates that even though the member has requested more information on a product or service, they have also given a low score on their survey.
  6. Date of Survey. This is the date the member completed the survey, not the date the member interaction took place.  To find out the date of the interaction, click on the survey number in the first column and look at the survey header.
  7. Member Name.  This is the name provided by the member within the survey.  If it is not populated, the meber has not provided their name within the survey.  You can still discover the member’s name by clicking on the number in the first column and looking at the survey header.  This will show the name of the member to whom the survey was sent.
  8. Member Email. This is the email address provided by the member.  If it is not populated, the member has not provided an email address within the survey.  You can still discover the email address by clicking on the survey number in the first column and looking at the survey header.  This will show the email address to which the survey was sent.
  9. Member Phone. This is the phone number provided by the member.  If it is not populated, the member has not provided a phone number within the survey.
  10. Coach and Branch or Department. This column indicates where the member interaction occurred. Coaches will see all interactions that occurred in their branch or department.
  11. Products. This column shows the specific product(s) or service(s) for which the member requested more information.  You can populate this column by creating your own custom upsell question.
  12. Status. This column indicates whether your team’s response to the member is open, fulfilled or won.  By clicking on the change status link in this column, a user can track progress toward winning.
  13. Aging Alert. This column indicates how many days the alert has been open.
  14. Notes. A pencil icon appears in this column if a user has left a note about the follow-up.  To view the complete survey with the notes or to add a note, click on the survey number in the first column.

Establishing a Member Upsell Process at Your Credit Union

The main thing to consider when establishing a follow-up protocol for members who request information is who will do the follow up.  MemberView is designed to allow individual branch and department coaches to follow up with members who’ve interacted with their branch.  By setting up the MemberView email alert system so that each branch or department coach gets an email alert triggered by a member follow-up request, your credit union can ensure that the entire team is involved in building member relationships.  Anyone with executive access can then monitor follow-up activity.

Some credit unions prefer all email alerts go only to a point person responsible for the member experience.  This person either follows up with the member or forwards the alert to the appropriate branch or department for follow up.  Branch and department coaches can still communicate their actions via the Opportunities report.

Once your member upsell process is established, you may want to set a custom goal for the number of days your team takes to respond.  Let us know what you’d like for your custom goal and we’ll set it up in your reporting portal.  If you’d like recommendations for this goal or for any other aspect of setting up your member upsell practice, please let us know.  We’re happy to help!

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Using the MemberView Saves Report to Retain Dissatisfied Members

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Using the MemberView Saves Report to Retain Dissatisfied Members

91% of customers eventually leave a company if they’re dissatisfied.  That’s no surprise, but what is revealing is that most of them say they could be retained if the company were to respond to their complaints.  Yet, few companies have a system or a strategy for reaching out to them.  MemberView changes all that.  One of the most powerful features of the MemberView Voice of Member program is the instant email alert and response tracking system built into the MXProdigy reporting portal.

Once you’ve set up email alerts to let your team know instantly that a member is unhappy, you can use the Saves report to track your retention efforts.  Learn how to access the Saves report here.

A Tour of the Saves Report

The Saves Tab on the MemberView Saves and Opportunities provides a robust data set for managing contacts with dissatisfied members.

Saves Report Features

  1. Select the Saves Tab to view a list of dissatisfied members.
  2. The gauges at the top of the screen show you the status of each dissatisfied member response. You’ll also see the average number of business days it takes your team to respond.  You can set a custom goal for the average number of days you’d like to take to respond.
  3. You can filter the report by
    • Status—Open, In Progress, or Resolved
    • Aging
    • Promoter StatusDetractor, Passive, or Both
    • Coaches (Users with Executive level access will see all coaches. Users with Coach level access will only see members assigned to them.)
  4. Survey Number. Click on this link to view the entire survey.
  5. Date of Survey. This is the date the member completed the survey, not the date the member interaction took place.  To find out the date of the interaction, click on the survey number in the first column and look at the survey header.
  6. Member Name.  This is the name provided by the member within the survey.  If it is not populated, the meber has not provided their name within the survey.  You can still discover the member’s name by clicking on the number in the first column and looking at the survey header.  This will show the name of the member to whom the survey was sent.
  7. Member Email. This is the email address provided by the member.  If it is not populated, the member has not provided an email address within the survey.  You can still discover the email address by clicking on the survey number in the first column and looking at the survey header.  This will show the email address to which the survey was sent.
  8. Member Phone. This is the phone number provided by the member.  If it is not populated, the member has not provided a phone number within the survey.
  9. Coach and Branch or Department. This column indicates where the member interaction occurred. Coaches will see all interactions that occurred in their branch or department.
  10. Promoter Designation. This column shows Passives (those who give a score of 7 or 8 out of 10) or Detractors (Those who give a score of 0 through 6 out of 10)
  11. Member Effort Score. This column is populated with a score when the member gives a score below a 6 out of 7.
  12. Overall Satisfaction Score. This column is populated with a score when the member gives a score below a 4 out of 5.
  13. Member Follow-up Request. When Yes appears in this column, the member has specifically requested a follow-up contact.
  14. Status. This column indicates whether your team’s response to the member is open, in progress or resolved.  By click on the change status link in this column, a user can track the progress toward resolution.
  15. Aging Alert. This column indicates how many business days the alert has been open.
  16. Notes. A pencil icon appears in this column if a user has left a note about the follow-up.  To view the complete survey with the notes or to add a note, click on the survey number in the first column.

Establishing a Dissatisfied Member Follow-up Practice at Your Credit Union

The main thing to consider when establishing a follow-up protocol for dissatisfied members is who will do the follow up.  MemberView is designed to allow individual branch and department coaches to follow up with members who’ve interacted with their branch.  By setting up the MemberView email alert system so that each branch or department coach gets an email alert triggered by a low score or a member follow-up request, your credit union can ensure that the entire team is involved in saving member relationships.  Anyone with executive access can then monitor follow-up activity.

Some credit unions prefer all email alerts go only to a point person responsible for the member experience.  This person either follows up with the member or forwards the alert to the appropriate branch or department for follow up.  Branch and department coaches can still communicate their actions via the Saves report.

Another consideration is whether to contact all members who give a low score or only those who specifically request a follow-up contact. (Read more about the low score criteria here. If your credit union decides only to contact those who request a follow-up contact, it’s still useful to look at all surveys with low scores and read the comments to see if a contact might be appropriate.  Here are two recommendations for handling surveys that appear on the Saves report that do not include a specific member request for follow-up:

Recommendation #1:

For members whose surveys meet the following criteria: (Must meet all 3 criteria to qualify).

  1. 7 or better on Net Promoter
  2. 3 or better on Member Satisfaction
  3. 4 or better on Member Effort Score

Open the survey and read all comments carefully.  If the member has left a comment that warrants follow-up,  contact the member.  If the member has not left a comment, review their accounts to check for any problems.  If there are none, mark the ticket as “resolved.”

Recommendation #2:

If a member meets the criteria above and appears on the “Saves Report,” and the member has left no comment, call the member with one of the following lead-ins:

  1. I noticed on a survey that you recently sent in regarding your (vehicle loan), you gave us a “7” out of “10” on the question, “Would you recommend us to a co-worker or friend?”  I wanted to make sure you were completely satisfied with your experience, and if not, what we can do to make it better?
  2. I noticed on a survey that you recently sent in regarding your (vehicle loan), you gave us a “3” out of “5” for your satisfaction level.  What could we have done to make this a “5” experience for you?
  3. I noticed on a survey that you recently sent in regarding your (vehicle loan), you gave us a “4” out of “7” for how easy it was to complete the process.  What could we have done to make it easier for you?

Be sure to make a note on each survey that you’ve decided does not require follow up, and change the status button to resolved.

It’s important to look at the entire survey and read all comments before contacting the member.  You can link to the entire survey via the survey number in the first column of the Saves report.

Once your member follow-up practice is established, you may want to set a custom goal for the number of days your team takes to respond to a dissatisfied member.  Let us know what you’d like for your custom goal and we’ll set it up in your reporting portal.  If you’d like recommendations for this goal or for any other aspect of setting up your dissatisfied member follow-up practice, please let us know.  We’re happy to help!

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Accessing the MemberView Saves, Opportunites, Social Media Report

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Accessing the MemberView Saves, Opportunities, Social Media Report

With the MemberView Saves, Opportunities, Social Media report, you can track your responses to dissatisfied members or those who request a follow up to their survey. You can also track sales lead fulfillment, member social shares, and member testimonial permissions.

Accessing the Saves, Opportunities, Social Media Report via the Online Portal

 Follow these steps to access the Saves, Opportunities, Social Media report once you’ve logged into MemberView.

Choose the Run a Report option at the top of the initial dashboard.

Run a Report Graphic

  1. Select Saves, Opportunities, Social Media from the report type drop-down menu.
  2. Choose the date range you want to view.
  3. Click on the orange Run Report button.

Accessing the Saves, Opportunities, Social Media Report Via Email Alerts

Before using the Saves, Opportunities, Social Media report you will want to set up email alerts to notify your team when members are dissatisfied or they request more information about products and services.

Team members who receive email alerts can go directly to the Saves, Opportunities, Social Media report in MemberView from a link within the email alert to view a survey and respond to a member.

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